Hyde Park, Austin Travel Guide

Hyde Park Summary

Pros

  • Historic neighborhood -- home to beautiful historic houses
  • Just north of the University of Texas
  • Quaint, tree-lined streets
  • Laid-back attitude (lots of front porches for sittin')
  • Home of the Elisabet Ney Museum, a castle-like sculpture museum and studio
  • Shipe Park has basketball courts, a pool, tennis courts, picnic tables, and a playground

Cons

  • Not much to do
  • Void of nightlife
  • Super-hot in the summer
  • Not within walking distance of Downtown Austin (12-mintue drive away)

What It's Like

Established in 1891, Hyde Park maintains its old-town charm -- many of the 19th-century homes have been restored (and now are on the National Register of Historic Places) and the tree-lined streets offer some shade from the Austin heat. Part of its old-town charm is its slow pace -- Hyde Park is mainly a residential area, completely void of nightlife and with limited restaurants and shops. Just north of the University of Texas, Hyde Park has become a popular neighborhood for students and professors.

There's not a ton to do in Hyde Park, but it offers a relaxing alternative to the fast-paced vibe of downtown. Residents of the area are often strolling through the town center (home to a few restaurants and coffee shops) or sitting on their front porches. The Shipe Park (named after Hyde Park's founder) has basketball courts, a pool, tennis courts, picnic tables, and a playground.

Where to Stay

Hyde Park has smaller boutique hotels and B&Bs that offer fewer amenities than downtown hotels, but a more personal feel. Staying on the southern side of Hyde Park puts visitors closer to the University of Texas.  

Facts

Language:

English

Airports:

Austin Bergstrom International Airport

Peak:

March-May; October-December

Off-Peak:

January-February; May-September

Visa:

No

Vaccines:

No

Currency:

U.S. Dollar

Electricity:

120 V, 60 Hz

Tipping:

15-20% at restaurants

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