Hawaii offers so much to do that dining can sometimes take a backseat to surfing, hiking, and diving -- especially since the islands have a reputation for expensive eats. But it shouldn't! Whether you want to try roast pork at a luau, catch your own dinner in the Pacific, or pick up some fresh fruit from the variety of farmers' markets on the islands, eating in Hawaii is almost always guaranteed to be delicious. We've picked out some of our favorite dishes and restaurants from across the islands, so be prepared to start salivating: Mama's Fish House is a Maui institution, serving traditional Polynesian cuisines since the 1970s. Located on a white sand beach on Maui's North Shore, the renovated beach house is tucked into a grove of coconut trees, creating a scenic atmosphere for dining. Dishes include island prawns, Tahitian-style ceviche, ti leaf-grilled ahi, and traditional roast boar.

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Eating Hawaii: Delicious Island Cuisine (1 of 12)

 Hawaii offers so much to do that dining can sometimes take a backseat to surfing, hiking, and diving -- especially since the islands have a reputation for expensive eats. But it shouldn't! Whether you want to try roast pork at a luau, catch your own dinner in the Pacific, or pick up some fresh fruit from the variety of farmers' markets on the islands, eating in Hawaii is almost always guaranteed to be delicious. We've picked out some of our favorite dishes and restaurants from across the islands, so be prepared to start salivating: Mama's Fish House is a Maui institution, serving traditional Polynesian cuisines since the 1970s. Located on a white sand beach on Maui's North Shore, the renovated beach house is tucked into a grove of coconut trees, creating a scenic atmosphere for dining. Dishes include island prawns, Tahitian-style ceviche, ti leaf-grilled ahi, and traditional roast boar.
Hawaii offers so much to do that dining can sometimes take a backseat to surfing, hiking, and diving -- especially since the islands have a reputation for expensive eats. But it shouldn't! Whether you want to try roast pork at a luau, catch your own dinner in the Pacific, or pick up some fresh fruit from the variety of farmers' markets on the islands, eating in Hawaii is almost always guaranteed to be delicious. We've picked out some of our favorite dishes and restaurants from across the islands, so be prepared to start salivating: Mama's Fish House is a Maui institution, serving traditional Polynesian cuisines since the 1970s. Located on a white sand beach on Maui's North Shore, the renovated beach house is tucked into a grove of coconut trees, creating a scenic atmosphere for dining. Dishes include island prawns, Tahitian-style ceviche, ti leaf-grilled ahi, and traditional roast boar. The North Shore of Oahu is dotted with shrimp trucks, but only one is the original: Giovanni's has been serving up the good stuff since 1993. Recipes are simple -- diners choose from classic shrimp scampi, hot and spicy, and lemon butter varieties -- but always delicious. Luaus across the islands vary in quality, but Paradise Cove's rendition is always fun and delicious. The roast port is a must try! Hawaiian coffee is largely regarded as some of the best in the world. Kona coffee, grown on the Big Island, is perhaps the most popular, but growers on Maui also offer up delicious brews -- like those from the Maui Grown Coffee Plantation, seen here. High quality sushi and sashimi is something of a given in a Hawaii, which obviously has access to some of the freshest fish the Pacific has to offer. The islands also see a large portion of Japanese visitors, whose discerning palates require that highly skilled sushi chefs prepare delicious, inventive dishes. Keoki's Paradise on Kauai serves some of the freshest seafood on the island. Matsumoto's Shave Ice has been an Oahu institution since 1951. Originally just a grocery store, the quaint shop is now best known for its delicious ices doused in homemade syrups. Both locals and tourists love the store, which now also sells t-shirts, souvenirs, and snacks. Over 1,000 snow cones can be sold in a day, with flavors such as mango, guava, lilikoi, papaya, and coconut offered. Hawaii's take on the hot dog elevates the fairly basic American staple to a new level. The Puka Dog starts off with fresh Hawaiian sweet bread (you can purchase King's Sweet Bread on the mainland in most grocery stores), adds a Polish sausage, and is then topped with a spicy garlic, lemon secret sauce. The real fun follows, when diners can choose their Hawaiian fruit relish (including mango, pineapple, banana, and star fruit). Queen's Bath is one of Kauai's best attractions. Roughly the size of a swimming pool, the natural tide pool can be found after hiking past a waterfall and down a rocky lava landscape. Fish can frequently be seen in the bath, but most are caught along the shorelines to either side of it. The bulk of Hawaiian wine -- of which there is a decent amount, thanks to the isnlands' high elevation -- comes from the island of Maui. Most wines come from the Symphony grape, which produces a somewhat dry, fruity white wine. The state also produces fun varieties, such as pineapple sparkling wine. Lappert's has been cooling down Kauai since 1983, when owner Walter Lappert made his first batch of ice cream on the island. One of the most popular flavors is the Kauai Pie: a mixture of coffee ice cream, macadamia nuts, coconut, and chocolate fudge. But others, such as the Guava Cheesecake, Kona Blue Espresso, and Manila Mango, keep visitors coming back time and again to this gourmet island eatery. Food stands and farmers' markets are wonderful pit stops for visitors needing a pick-me-up. Along the scenic Kamehameha Highway on Oahu, drivers can pull into a variety of food stands for fresh fruit and vegetables, drinks, shaved ice, and grilled meats. When driving up the Road to Hana, it's important to stay hydrated along the curves as the altitude gets higher and higher. To that end, a variety of food stands can be seen along the way, selling everything from smoothies to grilled shrimp. Unique offerings can also be found alongthe Road to Hana, like the suriname cherry. In actuality, these tiny fruits are miniature red pumpkins, originally from Brazil. They are just some of the interesting and unique eats you'll discover during your trip.
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