Iberostar Rose Hall Beach Rating: 3.5 Pearls

For an upbeat, all-you-can-drink mega-resort, the fresh-built Iberostar destroys the competition -- better food, liquor, service, and activities (including free scuba tours) for less cash. You pay a little more for an all-inclusive up-front, but with this resort's high-quality liquor and variety of dining options, you'll definitely eat and drink your money's worth.

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Best Value Hotels in Jamaica (1 of 33)

 For an upbeat, all-you-can-drink mega-resort, the fresh-built Iberostar destroys the competition -- better food, liquor, service, and activities (including free scuba tours) for less cash. You pay a little more for an all-inclusive up-front, but with this resort's high-quality liquor and variety of dining options, you'll definitely eat and drink your money's worth.
For an upbeat, all-you-can-drink mega-resort, the fresh-built Iberostar destroys the competition -- better food, liquor, service, and activities (including free scuba tours) for less cash. You pay a little more for an all-inclusive up-front, but with this resort's high-quality liquor and variety of dining options, you'll definitely eat and drink your money's worth. At breakfast, there is often a small line backed up at the made-to-order omelet station (with ham, green pepper, tomato, mushroom, onion, hot pepper, and cheddar cheese to choose from). The servers use fresh eggs, which they crack in front of the guests, rather than the premixed egg batter. The resort offers suba lessons and tours, kayakaing, and parasailing -- for free. The white, sandy, well-groomed beach (but for the tire tracks) is better than most of the beaches in Jamaica. Low-lying palm shades create the exotic environment, and there's full drink service by the water. Akin to everywhere else in MoBay, the beach was somewhat shell infested, and a bit of seaweed had washed ashore. But this didn't seem to stop any of the guests from diving in. Most drinks are much stronger here than at other all-inclusive resorts, meaning that they are about on par with any bar in the United States. Offering better-grade vodka (Absolut or Stoli), whiskey (Dewar's or Johnnie Walker Red) and gin (Tanqueray or Beefeater), as well as a top-shelf selection of aged Appleton rum, the Iberostar has one of the best bars in town. Even better, bartenders here can actually make cocktails, including some mean mojitos. Many of the barmen have their own secret, signature drink, like Andre's "Andre the Giant." The Grand Palladium has five pools, large rooms, name-brand liquor, tasty breakfasts, mini golf, and more -- all for lower rates than lesser-equipped all-inclusives. Large, fancy rooms have flat-screen TVs, iPod docks, wonderful marble showers, Jacuzzi tubs, and balconies. The spa, part of the Renova chain, is located inside a large, airy building modeled after Roman baths, with white columns and frescoes on the walls. The resort's most striking feature is its enormous 86,000-square-foot infinity pool, which surrounds the ground floor of the lobby and looks out to the ocean. It's open all night, so guests can swim under the stars in its illuminated glow. Ice cream at Xamayca, which serves Creole cuisine. This is the rare all-inclusive that doesn't require guests to line up for morning reservations for its a la carte restaurants. The lush, laid-back Rockhouse creates a holistic haven -- gourmet dining, morning yoga, cliffside loungers, a premium spa, and beautiful eco-appropriate design. But most astounding are the reasonable rates. (The slightly more chic Caves hotel can cost upwards of three times more.) On the cliff's edge, isolated duets of loungers rest on leveled platforms as high as 40 feet from the water, overlooking the most beautiful sunsets in the country. The Rockhouse Spa lies in the center of the resort, flanked on all sides by signs that read "Keep Vibes Calm." The spa offers a broad range of holistic treatments for singles or couples. Treatments can be performed in either the dark, Zen-Buddhist-themed facility or at "massage point," a three-walled hut overlooking the sea. The Rockhouse restaurant is one of the best in the West End, with a casual atmosphere and locally focused cuisine. At dinner, guests can watch the sun set over the cliffs and the sea. The queen-size four-poster, veiled in a mosquito net (appropriately so), had high-quality sheets and a hand-stitched quilt from Cool Change. The bathroom was stocked with locally made bath products from Starfish Oil; the company's soap and after-sun lotion are well worth smuggling home. A balcony or terrace stretches around every room, each with its own table and chairs, and comfy hammock swing (an unfortunate rarity in Jamaica). A balcony or terrace stretches around every room, each with its own table and chairs, and comfy hammock swing (an unfortunate rarity in Jamaica). Authentic Jamaican food, great cocktails, a friendly staff, and a beautiful, intimate setting bring guests back to the remote, beachfront Moxons year after year. This is definitely a no-frills kind of hotel -- threadbare rooms, a small pool, a tiny beach, slow service, no in-room phones, and no Internet -- but for most guests, the quiet isolation is all that matters. Until 2002, Moxons was a ramshackle guesthouse that was known only for its excellent restaurant. In fact, the food was so good, it was enough to convince a Canadian investor to buy the property and build a hotel around the restaurant. The menu focuses on local specialties, and the food really is superb. The beach has gorgeous, clear water, but there's not much shore to lounge on. Instead, swim out to a sandbar or walk along the piers. With just 30 hippie-chic cottages in secluded Treasure Beach, Jake's is a member of Island Outpost, Jamaica's trendiest hotel group. Guests come to unplug -- there's no phone, Internet, or TV in the cottages. The black-sand beaches aren't Jamaica's most impressive, but the Driftwood Spa, on-site painting and yoga classes, and excellent food make this a particular favorite. The Driftwood Spa has a calm, rustic, artsy aesthetic. The open-air yoga studio on top of the spa overlooks the ocean and offers sunrise and sunset yoga classes. The restaurant at Jake's serves a rotating menu of Jamaican dishes made with locally farmed produce and good quality meats. The two dining areas on either side of the lobby both have sweeping views of the pool and ocean, framed by drooping trees and lanterns. The restaurant's traditional ackee and saltfish is superb. The rustic, quirky cottages with a hippie-chic aesthetic lack TVs, Internet, or modern technology -- but that's the point. There's no pool, lobby, or dazzling features, but Catcha's quaint cliffside huts come with warm service, open-air showers, breathtaking sunsets, comfortable beds and simple homemade cuisine. You can eat one of the best breakfasts in Jamaica for free until 11 a.m. at Ivan's Bar. Each private hut has a large patio for private dining, smoking, or silently smelling the sea air. Guests can watch Jamaica's best sunsets from the rugged cliffs. With modern features, professional service, and a huge on-site water park, this relaxed, beachside golf resort is more popular with sober families than rum-chugging partyers. Though the rooms are small, they feature flat-screen TVs, iPod docks, spa-quality bath products, great beds, and a powerful Wi-Fi signal -- all rare luxuries in Jamaica. Rose Hall's main feature is the Sugar Mill Falls complex of waterslides, waterfalls and swinging bridges, all in a massive lagoon-shaped pool. The resort's golf course is actually on the main property (unlike at other resorts where guests have to arrange transportation), so golfers can walk right over to the beautiful greens. Rose Hall was originally started as a country club, so the greens are vintage. (Note that there's an extra charge to tee off.)
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