The Georgian Hotel Rating: 3.5 Pearls

A fully restored classic with charm, history, and a whiff of the paranormal, the 84-room Georgian Hotel once hosted the likes of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. The mobster Bugsy Siegel held court in the basement speakeasy, where the staff claims that strange voices, heavy breathing, and unexplained footsteps can be heard today. Across the street from the watrerfront in Santa Monica, the hotel offers commanding views of the Pacific.

Enter dates for best prices

Check-in
Check-out
Guests
 AVG/NIGHT 
Hotels.com  
Expedia.com  
Tingo.com  

Iconic Hotels in Los Angeles (10 of 10)

 A fully restored classic with charm, history, and a whiff of the paranormal, the 84-room Georgian Hotel once hosted the likes of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. The mobster Bugsy Siegel held court in the basement speakeasy, where the staff claims that strange voices, heavy breathing, and unexplained footsteps can be heard today. Across the street from the watrerfront in Santa Monica, the hotel offers commanding views of the Pacific.
When the Biltmore opened, in 1923, it was the largest hotel west of Chicago. It quickly became a Southern California institution, hosting eight Academy Awards ceremonies in the '30s and '40s. But then the Oscars moved, and so did the rest of the action, and downtown Los Angeles devolved into a veritable ghost town, a designation it has only recently -- and only partially -- shed. The Biltmore no longer feels very glamorous, and yet it remains an icon: In 1969, it was designated a Historic Cultural Landmark by the city. And the hotel's press packet includes an exhaustive 11-page list of every movie (Wedding Crashers, Spider-Man, Ocean's Eleven), TV show (Mad Men, 24, The West Wing), miniseries, movie-of-the-week, reality show, commercial, music video, and photo shoot ever filmed on the premises. The Ghostbusters caught their first spook -- remember the slimer? -- in the Biltmore's ballroom. Built in 1912, this iconic mission-revival hotel -- known as the "pink palace" -- is as old as Beverly Hills itself. Over the years, the hotel has housed celebrities from John Lennon and Yoko Ono to Elizabeth Taylor and six of her seven husbands. From 1992 to 1995, the hotel closed for extensive renovations that restored its original elegance and cost the Sultan of Brunei, the current owner, more than $100 million. Loosely modeled after a chateau in France's Loire Valley, this temple of romance and hedonism, built in 1929, has a history as deep as the stains on its carpets. Former residents include Greta Garbo, Robert DeNiro, and Lindsay Lohan. John Belushi overdosed in a bungalow, F. Scott Fitzgerald had a heart attack here, and members of Led Zeppelin rode motorcycles through the lobby. And the parade continues today. The Chateau is undeniably an icon -- one of the most storied hotels in the world -- and it's not for ordinary people: Those who love the Chateau tend to be part of the Hollywood tribe. They're drawn to its history, its distressed d├ęcor, and the air of exclusivity that pervades every nook and cranny. Originally built in 1939 and owned by the same family since 1983, this gleaming white Art Deco landmark, with just 71 rooms, juts out onto a corner of Ocean Avenue in Santa Monica like a cruise ship. As part of a recent two-year, $30 million makeover of the Shangri-La, L.A. designer Marc Smith subtly introduced a maritime motif. The dazzling pool and lounge area with striped cushions and tiered levels of shiny wood calls to mind the Queen Mary. First opened in 1927, the Roosevelt was host to the first Academy Awards and, over the decades, has been the temporary residence to a roster of stars longer than a summer blockbuster's credit reel. The ornate Spanish-style lobby sits right off the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Hotelier Jeff Klein, who also owns the swanky City Club in New York City, rescued the Sunset Tower in 2005, transforming the decrepit 15-story landmark back into the sparkling Art Deco hotel it once was. In the '30s and '40s, it was the temporary home of Howard Hughes, Billie Burke, Errol Flynn, and John Wayne. These days it delivers a kind of bygone glamour that's rare on the Strip -- hustling valets, white-jacketed waiters, and live piano music. Built by Conrad Hilton in 1955 at the busy Beverly Hills intersection of Wilshire and Santa Monica Boulevards, the stately white building plays host to nearly 175 red carpet events a year, including The Golden Globe Awards, in the International Ballroom. The hallways are filled with black-and-white photographs of stars from Marilyn Monroe to Esther Williams, and every president from John F. Kennedy to Bill Clinton stayed in the hotel's Presidential Suite. A fully restored classic with charm, history, and a whiff of the paranormal, the 84-room Georgian Hotel once hosted the likes of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. The mobster Bugsy Siegel held court in the basement speakeasy, where the staff claims that strange voices, heavy breathing, and unexplained footsteps can be heard today. Across the street from the watrerfront in Santa Monica, the hotel offers commanding views of the Pacific.
Related
Loading Live Rates
Loading...
multiple hotels like on roundups