Hotel Monteleone Rating: 4.0 Pearls

New Orleans is the birthplace of jazz, the feeder of the masses, and one of the top places to party in America. But it comes with a pulsing back-beat rooted in the city's rich history and thriving, unique culture. The historic center, which includes the French Quarter, Magazine Street, and the Garden District, is easily walkable and home to many fine historic hotels. Check out some of our favorites here: Perched high above the French Quarter, the Hotel Monteleone sign has been a beacon for lost travelers since 1886 and the iconic hotel has stayed in the same family ever since. So many writers have lived in the Monteleone -- Truman Capote, William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams, for starts -- that the property is registered as a national literary landmark.

Enter dates for best prices

Check-in
Check-out
Guests
 AVG/NIGHT 
Hotels.com  
Expedia.com  
Tingo.com  

Historic Hotels in New Orleans (1 of 6)

 New Orleans is the birthplace of jazz, the feeder of the masses, and one of the top places to party in America. But it comes with a pulsing back-beat rooted in the city's rich history and thriving, unique culture. The historic center, which includes the French Quarter, Magazine Street, and the Garden District, is easily walkable and home to many fine historic hotels. Check out some of our favorites here: Perched high above the French Quarter, the Hotel Monteleone sign has been a beacon for lost travelers since 1886 and the iconic hotel has stayed in the same family ever since. So many writers have lived in the Monteleone -- Truman Capote, William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams, for starts -- that the property is registered as a national literary landmark.
New Orleans is the birthplace of jazz, the feeder of the masses, and one of the top places to party in America. But it comes with a pulsing back-beat rooted in the city's rich history and thriving, unique culture. The historic center, which includes the French Quarter, Magazine Street, and the Garden District, is easily walkable and home to many fine historic hotels. Check out some of our favorites here: Perched high above the French Quarter, the Hotel Monteleone sign has been a beacon for lost travelers since 1886 and the iconic hotel has stayed in the same family ever since. So many writers have lived in the Monteleone -- Truman Capote, William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams, for starts -- that the property is registered as a national literary landmark. A grand Southern hotel with a haunting past, the Bourbon Orleans is home to a delicious Creole restaurant, a signature cocktail in its popular bar, and 218 mid-range rooms, some with balconies over Bourbon Street. The hotel nimbly straddles the past, present, and possibly the afterworld as well -- ask the bartender to see the digital photo of a nun's ghost, sighted in a hotel hallway. The spirit is supposedly one of the Creole nuns who ran a convent and orphanage on the site until the 1960s. More than a century earlier, war hero Andrew Jackson announced his run for president in one of the hotel's ballrooms. This historic landmark, carved from the city's earliest Whitney Bank branch, is one of four Wyndham properties in New Orleans. The hotel's single restaurant, Lil' Dizzy's, occupies part of the old bank, which has kept its grand marble pillars, gold-barred teller's windows, and an original mural (depicting, of all things, a bank robbery) painted along the back wall. Hand-numbered prints with money and banking themes frame the hotel hallways. Besides its excellent location on Bourbon Street, what makes this hotel unique is its history. One wall is devoted to vintage photos of the original Old French Opera House, and at least once a month the hotel hosts local opera singers at its Puccini Bar for a free concert, adding charm and culture to one of the world's most famous party blocks. Blocks away from Bourbon Street, a stay at Le Richelieu means you'll be going to the same coffee shops, diners and lunch joints as the neighbors who live in this charming, quiet part of the Quarter. Le Richelieu fits right in, with a long history dating to the early 1800s and several incarnations as a private mansion, a macaroni factory and an apartment building, which explains the hotel's unusually large rooms and closets, as well as the mothballed kitchenettes. The Bienville House's building is a nationally registered historic property, and in its early years was the site of a rice and syrup manufacturing plant. Its first incarnation as a hotel came in 1935, and the local Monteleone family bought it in 1972.
Related
Loading Live Rates
Loading...