The New York Palace Rating: 4.5 Pearls

Completely renovated in 2008, The New York Palace's standard rooms are large (360 square feet), and have all the essential comforts -- sateen bed linens and plush, pillow-top mattresses; a 42-inch Panasonic flat-screen TV; an iPod hookup on the alarm clock; and a quality minibar. But the Towers Royal Suites (pictured here) are decorated in a lavish, gilded style unlike any other New York hotel room.

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Best Hotel Rooms in New York (4 of 12)

 Completely renovated in 2008, The New York Palace's standard rooms are large (360 square feet), and have all the essential comforts -- sateen bed linens and plush, pillow-top mattresses; a 42-inch Panasonic flat-screen TV; an iPod hookup on the alarm clock; and a quality minibar. But the Towers Royal Suites (pictured here) are decorated in a lavish, gilded style unlike any other New York hotel room.
Loft rooms, the standard rooms at the Gramercy Park Hotel, are huge (370 to 440 square feet) and have a bold design that blends old-world elegance with a boho chic that's heavy on velvet. The big Louis XIV-style rooms were all renovated in 2008 with luxurious Italian bedding and 37-inch HD plasma TVs, but some of the views are weak -- very few rooms overlook Central Park. The gigantic bathroom comes with fixtures plated in 24-karat gold -- but not all name-brand toiletries. Massive (rooms start at 420 square feet), thoroughly modern rooms with elegant Asian decor, high-tech electronics, and bathrooms that include small flat-screen TVs. Beds have pillow-top mattresses and Egyptian cotton sheets by Fili D'oro. Addition perks include a yoga mat and books labeled "Bedside Reading" -- like an ironic pairing of The Great Gatsby and "Warren Buffet and the Interpretation of Financial Statements." Guests are even encouraged to take the books home. Completely renovated in 2008, The New York Palace's standard rooms are large (360 square feet), and have all the essential comforts -- sateen bed linens and plush, pillow-top mattresses; a 42-inch Panasonic flat-screen TV; an iPod hookup on the alarm clock; and a quality minibar. But the Towers Royal Suites (pictured here) are decorated in a lavish, gilded style unlike any other New York hotel room. Small details -- the antique, doily-like fabric draped over the backs of the chairs, the wainscoted ceiling, the brass fixtures, the Villeroy & Boch sink, and the pencils and par avion envelopes in the desk drawer -- make the Bowery's rooms shine, though they start at a fairly average size (220 square feet). Rooms are luxurious, without being adventurous. Starting at 500 square feet -- some of the largest standard rooms anywhere in New York -- the Four Seasons' rooms come with excellent beds, high-powered, two-head showers, large desks, and plush seating. Plus, the rooms on higher floors take in substantial daylight from large windows -- no small feat in skyscraper-riddled Midtown East. The Ace's small rooms -- standard rooms start at a mere 140 square feet -- feature custom artwork on the walls, making each room different. The brainy design takes a cue from the building's industrial surroundings; accents like garment racks, for example, are made of repurposed plumbing pipes fitted with black metal shelves. Dark, industrial notes aside, funky elements like turntables, blank sheet music, and cozy Pendleton wool bed covers made in Portland, Oregon, are a nod to the hotel's Northwest roots. For ecological reasons, the shampoo, conditioner, and body wash are in large pump dispensers, like those found at a health club -- but it's high-quality stuff from co-owner Alex Calderwood's Rudy's Barbershop. Rooms at the Thompson LES start at a comfortable 300 square feet -- larger than most New York boutique hotel rooms -- and the sleek, faux-industrial design includes floor-to-ceiling windows and a back-lit black-and-white Lee Friedlander photograph on the headboard. Because the hotel towers over the surrounding buildings, all rooms will have good views -- and you can watch the sunset from those on the west side of the building. Plenty of space, a high-concept Rockwell design, flat-screen TVs in the bathrooms, and Frette linens make even the standard rooms luxurious. There's an open closet built into the wall, a desk area with a series of vertical shelves, and a 29-inch Sharp Aquos flat-screen TV across from the oh-so-comfortable king bed. Even cooler, there's a small LCD TV in the bathroom next to the sink. The Alex hotel targets extended-stay business travelers, so 130 of the hotel's 203 rooms are suites that include luxe amenities like Poggenpohl kitchens, Sub-Zero refrigerators, and Miele dishwashers. The two-bedroom penthouse suite is 800 square feet. Hip midcentury-inspired ultramodern design, wall-to-wall windows that flood the space with light and allow for panoramic views of the city, comfy beds, and gigantic minibars add up to some of the most extraordinary rooms in the city.
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