Britannia Hotel Rating: 4.5 Pearls

The Britannia Hotel is Trondheim's grande dame. This historic luxury property (opened in 1897) has hosted royalty, celebrities, and diplomats over the years, and today continues to be one of the city's most prestigious options. Its rooms have traditional decor (most have plaid fabrics and wood furniture), and though they're not the most luxurious in town, the hotel's real draws are its historic character, impressive restaurants, and most notably, full-service spa -- one of the only hotel spas in Norway.

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Norway's Historic Hotels (8 of 8)

 The Britannia Hotel is Trondheim's grande dame. This historic luxury property (opened in 1897) has hosted royalty, celebrities, and diplomats over the years, and today continues to be one of the city's most prestigious options. Its rooms have traditional decor (most have plaid fabrics and wood furniture), and though they're not the most luxurious in town, the hotel's real draws are its historic character, impressive restaurants, and most notably, full-service spa -- one of the only hotel spas in Norway.
Norway's history is rich in Viking lore and medieval traditions, as well as royal scandals and industrial advancements. Some of our favorite hotels keep the nation's history alive. Check them out here: This luxury hotel on the water near Bryggen has glamorous, even sultry style. The elegant lobby has impressive crystal chandeliers, oversized royal purple chairs, and rich floor-to-ceiling curtains; the rooms also have some sexy style details such as royal purple fabrics. Some may find the rooms too dark, but others may like the dimly lit ambiance. The hotel is housed in a historic neo-Baroque building, and there is beautiful interior stonework in the tower section of the hotel off the lobby. Guests can request a key card to visit the tower for panoramic views. The 121-room Fretheim Hotel is the main hotel in tiny Flam, a village that's the jumping off point for a number of fjord cruises. The property has a rich history -- it dates back to the late 19th century -- and the common spaces have charm to spare. Rooms, however, are a mixed bag; 80 percent have basic mid-range decor, while the rest are higher-end. (American Wing Rooms are contemporary, while Historic Wing Rooms -- though lacking TVs for added authenticity -- are lovely and quaint.) The hotel makes the most of its unique, naturally beautiful location with soaring glass windows in the lobby and restaurant that frame the steep surrounding mountains. The Clarion Hotel Admiral, housed in a historic former boat warehouse on the Bergen harbor, is a solid option within walking distance of popular sights. Renovated rooms are contemporary and stylish; some have balconies with views of the water. The updated room decor is on par with that at the Clarion Collection Havnekontoret and the Radisson Blu Royal, but prices here tend to be lower. This historic, 107-room property is a haven for business travelers, with multiple meeting rooms and frequent conferences hosted on-site. The location on the harbor and within walking distance of Old Town will appeal to leisure travelers as well. Lovely historic details include wood paneling and chandeliers, but the overall feel is slightly corporate and some areas could use renovation. Room decor gets more impressive as you go up in price category, as do the amenities: Only suites come with L'Occitane toiletries and tea/coffee makers, and only Deluxe Rooms and above get robes and slippers. All rooms come with free bottled water, minibars, flat-screen TVs. This hotel, connected to the city's main train station, is a juxtaposition that works splendidly: The building is from 1854 and was Oslo's first train station, and in spring 2012 opened a stylish, tech-savvy boutique hotel decorated with funky, colorful motifs -- while still preserving some original details. High-tech features abound, and guests can check in on computers in the lobby, use their smartphones as a room key, and store their luggage in a personal lockbox. There's an Italian restaurant on-site, and the hotel's adjacency to the train station makes it as convenient to transportation as it gets (for both within Oslo and outward). This trendy 47-room boutique hotel is located in the quiet residential neighborhood of Majorstuen, to the northeast of the Royal Palace Park. It re-opened in spring 2011 after major renovations, and now features stylish contemporary decor throughout. The building housing the hotel dates to the late 19th century, and the hotel honors Oslo's past with subtle decor details; for example, historic photographs of the city are emblazoned on the elevator doors and on decorative pillows. Rooms blend traditional elegance with modern style, and come with flat-screen TVs, minibars, and walk-in showers. Opened in 1900, Hotel Continental is one of Oslo's two grand dames, with its main competitor -- Grand Hotel -- sitting just across the plaza. Stepping into the lobby is to step back in time, which makes this luxurious hotel a great option for history buffs. The rooms in the hotel's original portion have been gorgeously renovated, though the rooms in the hotel's other two sections are a bit more standard, and some are even dowdy. The location can't be beat, with the majority of Oslo's sights just outside the door. Don't forget to admire the hotel's impressive collection of Edvard Munch prints that line the lobby bar. The Britannia Hotel is Trondheim's grande dame. This historic luxury property (opened in 1897) has hosted royalty, celebrities, and diplomats over the years, and today continues to be one of the city's most prestigious options. Its rooms have traditional decor (most have plaid fabrics and wood furniture), and though they're not the most luxurious in town, the hotel's real draws are its historic character, impressive restaurants, and most notably, full-service spa -- one of the only hotel spas in Norway.
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