Bermuda Travel Guide

Bermuda Summary

Pros

  • Beautiful pink-sand beaches and turquoise waters
  • Doesn’t feel crowded
  • Very scenic with wonderful views
  • Accommodation options for every taste, from luxurious resorts to small, charming cottages
  • It’s a 2-hour flight from the East Coast
  • Good bus service that covers the whole archipelago
  • Generally safe
  • Great snorkeling and scuba diving
  • World-class golf courses
  • Family-friendly destination
  • Great semitropical weather year round
  • Fabulous shopping, especially in Hamilton (though don’t expect to find bargains)
  • Very rarely hit by hurricanes

Cons

  • Visitors can’t rent cars -- only mopeds, scooters, bicycles, and horse-drawn carriages
  • Winding, narrow roads with hundreds of blind curves and no shoulders...and driving is on the left side of the road
  • Extremely expensive taxis
  • Pretty dull, expensive dining scene (though there’s delicious fresh seafood)
  • Little nightlife
  • Many buildings lack clear street addresses

What It's Like

Despite its proximity to the East Coast of the U.S., this tranquil archipelago oozes British tradition (judges still wear white wigs) with a touch of Caribbean pace: Speed limits are 15 mph in the busy areas, and 20 mph in the countryside. Narrow, winding roads will lead you to breathtaking pink-sand beaches with clear waters great for snorkeling and swimming, or to some of the world’s best golf courses.

Whether you stay in the city of Hamilton or decide to go parish-hopping (the islands are divided into nine parishes for administrative reasons), you’ll see that there’s a lot to do besides sitting in the sun on one of the wonderful beaches: centuries-old sites; a long-abandoned railway trail where you can spot exotic wildlife; great shopping; bar-hopping in St George...And all this without the crowds of more popular destinations farther south, like the Caribbean islands or the Bahamas.

However, all this comes at a price -- taxis are ridiculously expensive (visitors can’t rent cars, and no luggage is allowed on buses), dining out will probably cost a fortune, and retailers go more for quality than for bargains. Nevertheless, this piece of “Paradise”, as the locals like to call it, is well worth its price.

Where to Stay

This string of islands might feel small enough to allow visitors to move around the island. However, you might want to carefully choose where to stay, since the speed limits and the winding roads make even the shortest of drives quite a challenge (or a huge investment, if you opt for a cab).

The best and most famous beaches, such as Horseshoe Bay and Elbow Beach, are all in the south, as are the biggest resorts. For proximity to historic sites and nightlife, head east to St George’s Parish. If you want a remote, secluded spot to curl up with your significant other, the northwestern area is a good option.

 

View all Bermuda Hotels

Facts

Languages: English
Airports: Bermuda International Airport (BDA)
Time Zone: ADT
Peak: April - Nov.
Hurricanes: June - Nov
Visa: No
Vaccines: No
Currency: Bermuda dollar, on par with the US dollar
Electricity: 110 V, 60 Hz (U.S. compatible)
Tipping: 15% for service; taxi drivers expect 10-15%

Oyster Travel Guides

City of Hamilton Travel Guide
Small, quaint, quiet and colorful, the capital of Bermuda encompasses everything this chain of islands… Read More
Hamilton Parish Travel Guide
Hamilton Parish Travel Guide
Hamilton Parish is a tranquil area surrounding Harrington Sound, on the northern end of Bermuda's… Read More
Paget Parish Travel Guide
Paget Parish Travel Guide
Paget Parish, with its beautiful pink-sand Elbow Beach and its numerous attractions, is one of… Read More
Sandys Parish Travel Guide
Sparsely populated Sandys Parish sits on the far western part of Bermuda, and is one… Read More
Southampton Parish Travel Guide
Southampton Parish is a good pick for those who come to Bermuda to get a… Read More
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